Sticking to my rule of “If it happens more than once I’m blogging about it” I’m bringing you this quick post around an issue I’ve seen a few times in a certain environment.  Although this is solved by only a few esxcli commands I always find it easier for me to remember (and find) if I post it here… 🙂

Anyways, as it is I have a couple of NFS datastores that sometimes “act up” a bit in terms of their connections.  For the most part they are fine and dandy – however every now and then they show up within the vSphere client as “inactive” and ghosted.  After checking the network (I always try and pin things on the network) it appears that all the connections are fine – Host communicates with storage, storage with host – the same datastores are even functioning fine on other hosts.  Logically my next step is to remount them on the host in question but when trying to unmount and/or remount them through the vSphere client I usually end up with a “Filesystem busy” error.

Thankfully it doesn’t take a lot to fix this issue, but could certainly become tedious if you have many NFS datastores which you need to perform these commands on…

First up, list the NFS datastores you have mounted on the host with the following

esxcli storage nfs list

You should see that the ‘inactive’ datastores are indeed showing up with false under the accessible column.  Make note of the Volume Name, Share Name and Host as we will need this information for the next couple of commands….

Before we can add our datastore back we need to first get rid of it.  The following command takes care of that…

esxcli storage nfs remove -v DATASTORE_NAME

Depending on whether or not you have any VMs registered on the datastore and host you may get an error, you may not – I’ve found it varies 🙂  Anyways, lastly we simply need to mount the datastore back to our host using the following command…  Be sure to use the exact same values you gathered from the ‘nfs list’ command.

esxcli storage nfs add -H HOST -s ShareName/MountPoint -v DATASTORE_NAME

There you go!  You should now have a happy healthy baby NFS datastore back into your storage pool.  On a side note I’d love to see some sort of esxcli storage nfs remount -v DATASTORE_NAME command go into the command line in order to skip some of these steps – but, hey, for now I’ll just use three commands.