Tag Archives: Veeam

Did you know there is a Veeam User Group?

vuglogorevLike most of you I’ve been attending VMUGs for quite a while now and over the last few years I’ve helping out by co-leading the Toronto chapter.  Each and every one I attend I always get some value out of it – whether it’s from presenting sponsors, talking with peers, or just creepily listening to conversations from the corner – one of the challenges we seem to have is getting the “conversation” going – getting those customers and community members sitting in the audience to voice their opinion or even at times get up and do a presentation on something.  For our last meeting I reached out to Matt Crape (@MattThatITGuy) to see if he might be interested in presenting – Matt was quick to simply say yes – yes, but on one condition – do I want to come and present at his Veeam User Group?  So, with that a deal was cut and I headed out this morning to my first Veeam User Group.

Veeam User Group – VMUG with out the ‘M’

Matt runs the Southwest Ontario Veeam User Group (SWOVUG) – I’ve seen the tweets and blogs around the SWOVUG events taking place, and have always wanted to attend but something always seemed to get in the way – for those that know me I’m a huge Veeam user and fan – so these events are right up my alley.  So, I did the early morning thing again, battled the dreaded Toronto traffic and headed up to Mississauga for the day to check it out.

The layout of the meeting is somewhat similar to a VMUG meeting we have – two companies kindly supported the event; HPE and Mid-Range – and in return got the chance to speak.  HPE started with a short but good talk around their products that integrate with Veeam; mainly 3PAR, StoreOnce and StoreVirtual.  They also touched on HP OneView and the fact that they are laser focused on providing API entry points into all their products.

I’m glad HPE didn’t go too deep into the 3PAR integrations as I was up next and my talking points were around just that.  I simply outlined how my day job is benefiting from those said integrations; more specifically the Backup from Storage Snapshot, Restore from Storage Snapshot and On-Demand Sandbox for Storage Snapshots features.

After a quick, but super tasty lunch (Insert Justin Warren disclaimer post here) Mid-Range took the stage  Mid-Range is a local Veeam Cloud Connect partner offering DRaaS and a ton of other services around that.    Mid-Range did more than simply talk about the services they provide – they more-so went into the challenges and roadblocks of consuming disaster recovery as a service, then touched briefly on how Veeam and themselves could help solve some of those…

Finally to cap the day off we had David Sayavong, a local Veeam SE take the stage to talk to us about “What’s new in version 9.5?”.  David’s presentation was not just him up there flipping through slides of features, but more of a conversation around certain features such as ReFS integration and how all of the new Veeam Agents will come into play.  Just a fun fact for the day – the audience was asked who had already upgraded to 9.5 – and honestly around 1/3 of the room raised their hands.  That’s 33% that have already upgraded to a product that just GA’ed only 7 days ago – talk about instilling confidence in your customers.

Anyways I wanted to breifly outline the day for those that may be thinking of attending like I was, but haven’t yet set aside the time to do so.

But there’s more…

I mentioned at the beginning of the post that there is always struggles with getting people to “speak up” – this didn’t seem to be the case at the Veeam User Group.  I’m not sure what it was but conversations seemed to be flying all over the place – for instance, after I was done talking about the integration with 3PAR there was a big conversation that started around Ransomware and security.    Each presentation seemed more like a round table discussion than a sales pitch.  It truly was a great day with lots of interaction from the both the presenting companies and the audience – everything you want from user group.

The user group intrigued me – and maybe some day I’ll through my name in to try and get something started up on “my side of Toronto” – it’s Canada right – there’s only a handful of IT guys here so everything east of Toronto is mine Smile  For more information about the Veeam User Groups keep an eye out on the Veeam Events page and @veeamug on Twitter!  And to keep track of the SWOVUG dates I suggest following @MattThatITGuy and watching the swovug.ca site!  Good job Matt and team on a great day for all!

Does Veeam Backup from Storage Snapshot make things faster?

veeamlogoLater on this week I’m getting the chance to present at my first ever Veeam User Group – My topic – Veeam & 3PAR  Now as I was preparing some slides and asking around/researching the community I came to the realization that some people may be under some false pretenses as it pertains to the Veeam Backup from Storage Snapshot feature.  For the most part I see people under the assumption that backing up from a storage snapshot is all about speed – however in my experiences it really hasn’t been.  Now that’s not to say it isn’t faster, it most certainly could be, but not for any reasons that it is actually copying the data out faster, but for the reasons that it speeds up other functions of the backup process.  To help with this, let’s take a look at both the “traditional” Veeam backup process and the Backup from Storage Snapshot Process

Traditional Veeam Backups

Veeam performs a lot of tasks when it completes a backup of a vSphere VM – but for the sake of this post, let’s just take a look at how it handles snapshots.  The traditional Veeam backup process can essentially be broken down into three major steps

  1. Veeam instructs vCenter to take a snapshot of the source VM
  2. Veeam utilizes CBT data and copies those blocks which have changed to the target.
  3. Veeam instructs vCenter to delete the snapshot of the source VM.

Looking at it like this it appears to be quite simple but there are a lot of challenges with this.  First up, the copying of data step – this could potentially take a long time depending on the initial size and change rate of your virtual machines.  During this time, the VMware snapshot will continue to grow – which could possible double in size.  When Veeam finally gets to step 3, the snapshot deletion, VMware is forced to copy all of those changed blocks that were written while the backup was running back into original vmdk – this process can and usually does involve a large amount of reads and writes, which most certainly affects the performance of our VM.  On top of this VMware attempts to ‘stun’ the virtual machine by creating yet another snapshot to help with the removal – now if our VMs are generating data fast enough we could experience an overall loss of responsiveness as our storage tries to catch up.  Now VMware has made a lot of changes as to how they consolidate and remove snapshots in vSphere 6 which I suggest you read about – but the issues of having to have an active VMware snapshot during the backup process remain….

Backup from Storage Snapshot

When Veeam performs a backup from a Storage Snapshot it is able to discard of the vSphere snapshot in a much more efficient way – we can break down the steps below…

  1. Veeam instructs vCenter to take a snapshot of the source VM
  2. Veeam instructs the storage array to take a SAN snapshot of the LUN containing the source VM
  3. Veeam instructs vCenter to delete the snapshot of the source VM. (Happens on production LUN)
  4. Veeam utilizes CBT and the VM snapshot data that still exists on the Storage Snapshot to copy out changed blocks to the target
  5. Veeam instructs the storage array to discard the SAN Snapshot

So how does this help you ask?  We still see the VMware snapshot being created.  The difference here is that Steps 1-3 take literally seconds.  The vSphere Snapshot is created, SAN Snapshot is created, then the vSphere snapshot is discarded immediately after.  Due to the nature of SAN Snapshots this essentially redirects all changed writes to our production LUN while leaving our snapshot LUN available for backup processing – all the while removing the requirement of having the VMware snapshot open for the backup duration.  At the end of the backup process, the SAN Snapshot is simply discarded…

So, is Backup from Storage Snapshot faster – well, it depends.  Sure, it does speed things up, but not in a data copy/processing way – more so in a snapshot commit way.  In a Backup from Storage Snapshot job, our VMware snapshot is only open for a little time, therefore it shouldn’t take as long to consolidate it as if it were open for the complete backup job.  That said, the real value of the Backup from Storage Snapshot comes from the short VMware snapshot commit time – and the no stun, more so than any decrease of the backup time.

So there you have it – just my two cents for the day!  And hey, if you are in or around Toronto/Mississauga on Wednesday be sure to register and stop by the Veeam User Group!

Thanks for reading!

Friday Shorts – VMware, Veeam, Docker and Community

Dreams are important!  Otherwise, sleep is just 8 hours of nothing. – MacGyver

vSphere 6.5 is here!

VMware LogoNDA’s have been lifted and the flood gates have opened in terms of bloggers around the world talking about vSphere 6.5!  Now that the product has finally been declared GA we can all go ahead and download it today!  Certainly the new HTML5 client, the addition of a more functional vCenter Server Appliance and built-in disk level encryption are enough to make me want to make the jump…eventually 🙂  That said there is a lot that is new with vCenter and ESXi – you can check it all out here.

Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 is here!

veeamlogoAnd just as VMware releases it’s flagship hypervisor software to the masses Veeam follows behind one day later with the support and availability back it all up with their updated release of version 9.5 of Backup & Replication.  There is a lot that’s new within this release – check it all out here!  With Nimble support and a ton of integration with other Veeam products such as the Veeam Agents this release has a lot – but perhaps some of my favourite enhancements will be the ones that will probably not be written about the most and that’s all of the engine enhancements and things like the vSphere inventory cache.  As with most Veeam releases I’m sure this one will be well adopted!

Tech Field Day 12 – that’s a wrap!

tfd-logo-100x100I’ve just returned home from Tech Field Day 12 in beautiful San Jose!  I say beautiful but I was told it was cold by multiple people there – that said, I’m Canadian, and 18C in the middle of November is not my idea of cold 🙂  Either way I sat with 11 of my peers around the TFD table for a couple of days and got blasted by the fire hose.  There was some great presenting companies there; think Dell-EMC, DriveScale, Rubrik, Cohesity, StorageOS, Docker, and Igneous.  Expect more in this space about what these guys had to talk about but for now if you want to check out the videos you can do so – links are all over here.

Fancy some community recognition!

Ah, November – cooler air, the transition from Halloween to Christmas – and of course, a flurry of forms to fill out if you’d like to be included in any vendor/community recognition programs.  Most of these things require you to nominate yourself – so suck up any pride as you may have to get a little self absorbed while you try and brag yourself up.  Recognition programs are a funny thing – Some are great, some are so-so – I’m not going to go into the details of each.  If you want a great spot to see a list of them all Jim Jones has a great post outlining everything here.  And to get a glimpse into one of my favourties, the Veeam Vanguard program – check out Matt Crapes post here.  I’ve also been invited to the KEMP VIP program – which is new to me so expect to see more about that as well in the future.

Beetlejuice, Beetlejuice, Docker

docker-logo-300-71x60I feel like I can’t attend any presentation anymore without hearing the work Docker – honestly, containers and Docker is just popping up everywhere – with the oddest of technologies claiming they have support for Docker.  So, with all this my problem is, What the eff is Docker – I’ve never had a use-case to even start looking at containers within my day job – therefore, I don’t really have that much knowledge around the challenges and benefits of them.  After seeing them at TFD I can now say that I need to explore this further – and jump on this container bandwagon to learn what they are all about.  First stop, Mr Stephen Foskett’s blog where he tells us just “What the deal with containers are“.  If you are just learning, or just love containers – check it out!

Setting yourself up for success with Veeam Pre-Job Scripts

For a while Veeam has been able to execute scripts post-job, or after the job completes – but it wasn’t until version 8 of their flagship Backup and Replication product that they added the ability to run a pre-job script, or a script that will execute before the job starts.  When v8 first came out with the ability to do this I strived to try and figure out what in the world I would need a pre-job script for – and for the longest time I never used it in any of my environments.  If a job failed I would execute post job scripts to run and hopefully correct the reason for failure – but a while back it kind of dawned on me – and with a bit of a change in mindset I realized something – Why fail first?

veeamprejobscript

Why fail when success is possible?

As I mentioned above I’d grown accustom to using post-job scripts to correct any failing jobs.  For instance, there were times when for whatever reason a proxy would hold on to a disk of one of my replica’s – subsequently, the next run of this job would fail trying to access this disk – and even more importantly consolidation of any VMs requiring it would fail as the original replica couldn’t access the disk mounted to the proxy.  What did I do to fix this?  Well, I added script that executed post-job looking to simply unmount any disks off of my Veeam proxies that shouldn’t be mounted.

Another scenario – I had some issues a while back with some NFS datastores simply becoming inaccessible.  The fix – simply remove and re-add them to the ESXi host.  The solution at the time was to run a post-job script in Veeam.  If the job failed with the error of not being able to find the datastore then I ran a script that would automatically remove and re-add the datastore for me – Next job run everything would be great!

“Fail and Fix” or “Fix and Pass”

So, the two solutions above, while they do fix the issues they do it after the fact – after we have already failed.  Even though it fixed everything up for the next run of the job I’d still lose that one restore point – and sure enough, the time WILL come where it’s that exact point in time you will need to recover from!  The answer to all this is pretty simple – migrate your post-job scripts to pre-job scripts.  Let’s set ourselves up for success before we even start our job!  Although this may seem like common sense – for whatever reason it took a while before I saw it that way.

So with all that – hey, let’s add some code to this post.  Below you will find one of my scripts that runs before each Veeam job – my proactive approach to removing non-veeam proxy disks from the proxies!

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Add-PSSnapin VeeamPSSnapIn
Add-PSSnapin VMware.VIMAutomation.core
 
Connect-VIServer vcenter.mwpreston.local -u username -pass password 
 
# get job name out of parent process id
$parentpid = (Get-WmiObject Win32_Process -Filter "processid='$pid'").parentprocessid.ToString()
$parentcmd = (Get-WmiObject Win32_Process -Filter "processid='$parentpid'").CommandLine
$jobid = $parentcmd.split('" "')[16]
$vbrjob = get-vbrjob | where-object { $_.Id -eq "$jobid" }
 
#get some info to build replica VM names
$suffix = $vbrjob.options.ViReplicaTargetOptions.ReplicaNameSuffix
$vms = $vbrjob.getObjectsInJob()
 
#create array of replica names
$replicasinjob = @()
foreach ($vm in $vms)
{
 $replica = $vm.name+$suffix
 $replicasinjob += $replica
}
 
#loop through each replica and check Veeam proxies for foreign disks
foreach ($replicaitem in $replicasinjob)
{
 $replica = $replicaitem.tostring()
 Get-VM -Location ESXCluster -Name VBR* | Get-HardDisk | where-object { $_.FileName -like "*$replica*"} | Remove-HardDisk -Confirm:$false
}
 
exit

So as you can see this is a simple script that basically retrieves the job name it was called from (Lines 7-10) – By doing it this way we can reuse this block of code in any of our jobs.  Then simply searches through all of the disks belonging to Veeam proxies (Line 28) – if it finds one that belongs to one of our replica’s we are about to process, it removes it.  Simple as that!  Now, rather than failing our job because a certain file has been locked, we have set our self up for a successful job run – without having to do a thing!  Which is the way I normally like it 🙂  Thanks for reading!

VMCE v9 Study Guide – Module 10 – Veeam ONE Reporting

VMCE Logo

Just as was with the Veeam ONE dashboards post this post is a lengthy one – and quite honestly just created to help me remember all of the different reports and options available within Veeam Reporter.  Again, just as with Veeam ONE Monitor – Reporter is on the exam and you will need to know a little bit about what all it can provide.

Veeam Reporter contains a number of useful reports that can help us to monitor both our virtual infrastructure along with our backup infrastructure.

  • VMware Infrastructure Assessment
    • ensures that your VMs can be successfully backed up by looking for configuration and incompatibilities that may affect backup job
    • helps predict the amount of future changes on disks that may have an influence on your backup window, consumed backup capacities, or WAN bandwidth allocated
    • Contains the following reports
      • Datastore Performance Assessment – helps to assess current load on storage in order to best define values in Backup I/O control
      • VM Change Rate Estimation – helps to predict sizes of incremental backups by tracking change rate
      • VM Configuration Assessment – lists VMs that could face issues when getting backed up.
  • Veeam Cloud Connect Report Pack
    • Tracks our VCC Infrastructure
    • Contains following Reports
      • Cloud Connect Inventory – displays inventory information for VBR and Cloud Connect components including licensing
      • Cloud Connect Replication Provisioning – helps define whether existing plans for hardware match our hosts and datastore capabilities to avoid potential issues caused by over provisioning.
      • Over Provisioned Backup Repositories – tracks and calculates the number of days left before we will breach a specified threshold in terms of space utilization
      • Veeam Cloud Connect User Report – Allows providers to analyze configuration and quota usage on repositories.  Helps to prevent running out of space and keeps an eye on users activities and quotas
  • Veeam Backup and Replication Report  Pack
    • Analyzes health, performance and efficiency of VBR.
    • Contains the following reports…
      • Backup Alarms Overview –  displays most frequently triggered alarms and most affected VBR infrastructure objects
      • Backup Billing – allows MSPs to generate billing statements for customers.
      • Backup Copy Job – Helps to analyze traffic savings of Backup Copy Jobs and WAN Accelerators
      • Backup Copy Job GFS Backup Files – Allows administrators to easily track GFS restore points and when certain backups will be removed including the size and day they are to be removed.
      • Backup Infrastructure Assessment – helps to improve job configuration and implement necessary hardware and software recommendations.  Helps you attain a lower backup window, lower resource consumption and more efficiency throughout your whole VBR environment
      • Backup Inventory – displays information on the state of backup infrastructure components and licensing details
      • Backup Job Data Exclusions – reviews exclusion settings configured in jobs.
      • Backup Jobs Historical Information – exhaustive information on the state of recent jobs.
      • Capacity Planning for Backup Repositories – analyze configuration of space utilization of repositories to forecast how long until the repository reaches capacity.
      • Current Backup Alarms State Overview – detects and resolves current and most pressing issues with VBR
      • Delegated Restore Permissions Overview – audits restore permissions.
      • Job Configuration Change Tracking – reviews user activity and tracks changes made to jobs.
      • Job Configuration Dump – helps to review settings of the current configuration of VBR jobs.
      • Latest Backup Job Status – helps administrators monitor recent VM protection operations.
      • Orphaned VMs – discovers VMs present in existing backups, but missing within a VBR job.
      • Protected VMs – helps to discover which VMs in the environment have up to date restore points and which are set to be backed up, but do not have a recent restore point.
      • Protected VMs Job Schedule – publishes the time table for scheduled jobs and their respective VMs
      • Replica Billing – assesses storage management costs for replication and auto generate billing statements.
      • Restore Operator Activity – tracks restore activities across all different restore methods as well as most popular recovery items.
      • Scale-Out Backup Repository Configuration – shows configuration and utilization of SOBR and their respective extents
      • SQL Backup Job Historical Information – tracks historical stats of SQL Backup jobs
      • SureBackup Jobs Overview – validates completion status and results of verification tests for SureBackup jobs.
      • Tape Backups – Maintains a record of all VMs archived to tape
      • Tape Exportation – information in regards to backup files located on tapes that have been exported from tape libraries.
      • Tape GFS Configuration – Information about GFS Media Pools – what tapes are exported, where they are stored, what tapes are assigned to certain media sets.
      • Tape Media Retention Period – information on retention policy settings configured for tape media pools.
      • Tape Vaults Overview – what vaults do we have, what tapes are archived in the vaults and what was their previous location.
      • Unmapped datastore LUNS – which shared datastores are not mapped to a proxy, thus no Direct SAN mode.
      • Veeam Backup Files Growth – capacity planning to asses historical growth of backup files.
      • Verified VMs – allows for a quick view of SureBackup results and confirm backups are recoverable.
      • VM Backup Compliance Overview – lists VMs that do not meet the requirement of having a certain number of backup copies available.
      • VM Backup Status – provides info on the backup status of all protected VMs
      • VM Change Rate History – track jobs who’s backup files and replicas grow too fast.
      • VM Failover Plan Overview – analyzes failover plan configuration and provides information on how much data is consumed by replica VMs on the target datastores.
      • VMs Backed up by Multiple Jobs – Finds VMs which are included in more than one job.
      • VMs with no Archive Copy – helps to assess whether mission critical VMs have backup copies stored on secondary backup repositories or tape.
  • VMware Overview Report Pack
    • Contains the following reports
      • Cluster Configuration – allows you to keep an eye on the state of hardware resources provided to cluster and verify configuration settings of clusters
      • Datastore Capacity – shows information on the amount of used and free space on datastores, virtual and logical disks.
      • Datastore Configuration – helps to monitor storage capacities ensuring VMs have sufficient room to run.
      • Datastore space usage history –  analyzes amount of space consumed historically showing growth, both high and low on your datastores.
      • Guest Disk Free Space – Information on VM guest disks such as capacity, free space, etc.
      • Guest Disk Space Usage – evaluates disk health based on capacity, free and used space.
      • Host Configuration – documents host configuration in the environment
      • Hypervisor Version – evaluates what versions each host is running.
      • Infrastructure Overview – monitors health and state of objects within your virtual environment.
      • VMs Configuration – documents current configuration of VMs such as cpu, power state, usage, VMware tools, Guest OS, etc.
      • VMs Growth –  tracks number of VMs in the environment and how it has been changing.
  • VMware Monitoring Report Pack
    • Contains the following Reports
      • Alarms Current State Overview – shows unresolved alarms from Veeam ONE Monitor
      • Alarms Overview – Shows most common alarms and most affected virtual infrastructure objects
      • Cluster Hosts Performance – helps to tweak DRS settings, performance settings and cluster health – from a host point of view
      • Cluster Performance – Same as cluster hosts performance but from a cluster point of view
      • Datastore Performance – shows historical and current IOPS/errors, etc.
      • Host Performance – stats on CPU, memory, disk, and network.
      • Host Uptime –top and lowest uptime for hosts (top 5).  Also how long each host was down, etc.
      • Multiple Clusters Performance – aggregates historical data for clusters.  Top consuming hosts, VMS, usage trends, etc.
      • Resource Pool and vApp Performance – stats on resources for vApps and resource pools.
      • VM Performance – resource statistics on VMs and trending.
      • VM Uptime – Top/Lowest uptime for top 5 VMs.  Also shows how long each VM has been down.
  • VMware Optimization Report Pack
    • Contains the following reports
      • Active Snapshots – shows VMs with snapshots, when they were created, size of snapshot and how old they are.
      • Garbage Files – shows space consumed by files that do not belong to VMs
      • Idle Templates – shows templates that haven’t been utilized in a specified period, including location, size and last time accessed.
      • Idle VMs – shows VMs that have been idle for a specified period.
      • Inefficient Datastore Usage – shows amount of space consumed by VMs that have been inactive for one month, six month, and one week.
      • Orphaned VM Snapshots – Shows amount of space consumed by snapshots that are no longer in use by the VM.
      • Oversized VMs – detects VMs with more RAM/CPU than they require.
      • Powered Off VMs – shows VMs that were powered off for a specified period.
      • Undersized VMs – identifies VMs which require more CPU/Memory.
  • VMware Capacity Planning Report Pack
    • Contains the following reports
      • Capacity Planning –  forecasts how many days remain before we meet a specific threshold.
      • Host Failure Modeling – Simulates failover of one ore more hosts to forecast CPU/Memory usage on the remaining hosts.
      • How many more VMs can be provisioned – calculates how many more VMs we can support before we meet a specified threshold.
      • Over provisioned Datastores – assesses potential impact of over provisioning thin provisioned VMs on datastores.
  • VMware Configuration Tracking Report Pack
    • Contains the following reports
      • Infrastructure Changes Audit – analyzes recently infrastructure changes
      • Infrastructure Changes by Object – detailed information on changes to a specific object.
      • Permissions by Object –  audits permissions to specific objects.
      • Permissions by User – audits permission based on user
  • Hyper-V Infrastructure Assessment
    • Contains the following reports
      • Configuration Assessment – compares Hyper-V infrastructure against a set of recommended settings and best practices.  Mitigates issues that might prevent VMs from being backed up.
      • Performance Assessment – analyzes Hyper-V infrastructure to confirm its configured optimally.
  • Hyper-V Overview Report Pack
    • Contains the following reports
      • Alarms Overview – review the triggered alarms from Veeam ONE Monitor
      • Cluster Configuration – documents current configuration of clusters and reports on memory, cpu and storage utilization
      • Datastore Capacity – documents configuration of CSVs, SMB shares and local disk, reports on total capacity, free, used and provisioned and calculates trends.  Also includes top 3 VMs in terms of capacity usage.
      • Host Configuration – documents current configuration of hosts and reports on CPU, Memory, Network and storage utilization
      • Infrastructure Overview – Shows properties of SCVMM servers, clusters, CSVs, SMB Shares, local disks, hosts and networks.  Distribution of MV by power states, integration services status.
      • VMs Configuration – provides details on cpu, memory, power state, disk usage, etc.
      • VMs Growth – tracks how the number of VMs within the environment changes and how it influenced resources.
  • Hyper-V Monitoring Report Pack
    • Contains the following reports
      • Failover Cluster Performance – shows top consuming hosts within cluster as well as CPU, Memory, Disk and Network resource utilization
      • Host Performance – Shows top consuming VMs on a host as well as all CPU, Memory, Disk and network resource utilization
      • Local Datastore Performance – Lists top 3 consuming VMs as well as read/write latency, read/write rate, and IOP Statistics
      • VM Performance – Shows stats around CPU, Memory, disk and network as well as trending.
      • VM Uptime – shows top 5 VMs with most and least uptime, as well as all VMs whose uptime is lower than specific thresholds
      • Windows 2008 CSV Performance – Aggregates all Win 2008 CSVs to show read/write rates and IOPS as well as top 3 consuming VMs
      • Windows 2012 CSV Performance – same as Windows 2008 but the addition of directed/redirected access mode.
  • Hyper-V Optimization Report Pack
    • Contains the following reports
      • Active Snapshots – shows snapshot age and size for all VMs containing snapshots.
      • Idle VMs – Shows CPU, Memory, disk and network utilization of idle VMs
      • Oversized VMs – Shows oversized VMs by CPU and Memory as well as all VMs with static memory.
      • Powered Off VMs – Shows VMs that have been powered off between a specified time period.
      • Undersized VMs – Identifies VMs who need more CPU/Memory.
  • Hyper-V Capacity Planning Report Pack
    • Contains the following reports
      • Capacity Planning – allows you to project how many days you have remaining across all aspects of your environment
      • Host Failure Modeling – allows you simulate failures of one or more hosts.
      • Over-provisioned Datastores – shows top 5 over and under provisioned datastores as well as datastores with least amount of free space remaining.
  • Custom Report Pack
    • Contains the following reports
      • Custom Infrastructure – allows you drill down into infrastructure objects and data not covered in other reports.
      • Hyper-V Custom Performance – can define specific metrics to monitor in terms of CPU, memory, network and disk for Hyper-V, CSVs and SMB Shares
      • Hyper-V Raw Performance Data – can get detailed raw data of all Hyper-V Metrics
      • Inventory – provides the most complete and up to date configuration information of all objects in the virtual environment
      • Report Builder – Merges data generated by separate custom reports into a single document.
      • VMware Custom Performance – allows you to define specific metrics in terms of CPU, Memory, Network and Disk for vSphere.
      • VMware Raw Performance data – get detailed raw data in terms of CPU, memory, network and disk for vSphere.
  • vCloud Director Report Pack
    • Contains the following reports
      • Catalogs Overview – shows an inventory of catalogs for selected organizations
      • Multiple Organizations vDC Performance – aggregates historical data for selected organizations (CPU, disk, network)  Lists top consuming vApps and VMs
      • Multiple vApps Performance – shows performance and resource statistics for a specific time period in the scope of a vApp.  Rates VMs by resource usage level and trends.
      • Organization Configurations –shows current configuration of organizations within the vCloud Director Infrastructure
      • Organization vDC Performance – shows performance stats for a specific organization datacenter across a specific time frame.
      • Provider vDC Performance – shows provider virtual datacenter statistics over a specific timeframe
      • vApp Configuration – Shows vApp configuration as well as top 5 cpu consuming vapps, memory, storage, etc.  shows number of powered on/off/resolved/and suspended vApps.
      • vApp Performance – shows CPU, memory, disk, network stats for a specific vApp and shows top consuming VMs.
      • VM Performance – shows performance stats for specific VMs
      • VM Uptime – shows top 5 highest/least VMs in terms of uptime, as well as VMs who have uptime values lower/greater than a specified threshold.
  • Offline Report Pack
    • allows you to export raw data/inventory into a couple external formats.
    • Contains the following reports
      • Infrastructure Overview (visio) – exports your inventory and configuration specifics to visio format.
      • Raw Data Analysis – Creates an Excel workbook containing detailed raw data on all objects within VMware.

VMCE Study Guide – Module 10 – Veeam ONE Dashboards

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I apologize for the repetitiveness between this post and the Veeam ONE user guide, but honestly I learn a lot by writing things down – and since I wrote it down I’ll share it.  There isn’t alot of information here about each and every dashboard – there is a lot of them and to go through them would be very exhausting.  That said, Veeam ONE Dashboards is on the course outline for the VMCE exam, and there is a good chance you will end up getting some questions around them – so best to go through them all….  With that said, here’s a portion of Module 10 of the VMCE Study Guide.

Veeam ONE Dashboards

Veeam ONE contains many different dashboards dealing with both your infrastructure and your Backup Infrastructure.

Backup Infrastructure Dashboards

  • Backup Infrastructure Summary – shows the latest state of the backup operations in your virtual environment and indicates the most used resources in the backup infrastructure with the following charts.
    • Backup Jobs by  Status, Replication Jobs by Status, SureBackup Jobs by Status
    • Top Repository Servers by Used Space
    • Top Proxy Servers by Weekly processed disks
  • Backup Repositories Overview – overview and performance analysis for repositories.
    • Repositories Overview (# of repos, # of VM backups in repos, space occupied by full/incremental backups)
    • Top Repositories by used space
    • Top Repositories by days left
    • Top Repositories by weekly backup window
  • Backup Repository Summary – information about an individual repository
    • Repository Overview
    • Capacity Planning (# of days before no space)
    • Free space usage (amount of used storage vs amount of available storage.
  • Proxy Servers Overview – configuration and performance overview for proxies
    • Proxy Server Overview – break down of proxies by transport mode
    • Top proxies by processed VMs – top 5 backup proxies that process the greatest number of VMs over the past 7 days
    • Top Proxy by Transferred Data – top 5 backup proxies that transferred the greatest amount of data over the past 7 days
    • Top Proxies by Weekly Backup Window – detect the most busy proxy servers over the last 7 days
  • Proxy Server Summary – details on an individual proxy
    • Proxy Server Overview (number of task currently processing, transport mode, number of VMs processed over the last 7 days, number of VM disk processing task that can be assigned at the same time.
    • Number of processed disks – how many VM disk the proxy processed over the past 7 days
    • Transferred data – amount of backup data the proxy has transferred over the past 7 days.
    • Backup Window Utilization – estimates how busy the proxy was during the past 7 days.
  • WAN Accelerators Overview
    • WAN Accelerator Overview – number of WAN Accelerators, number of VMs stored in restore points that were transferred using acceleration, total network traffic sent by accelerators, amount of saved traffic.
    • Top Accelerators by Acceleration Efficiency – shows 5 accelerators that save the greatest amount of traffic over the past 7 days.
    • Top Accelerators by Transferred Data – top 5 accelerators that transferred the greatest amount o VM data over the past 7 days.
  • WAN Accelerator Summary
    • Overview – number of vms stored in restore points or received by the accelerator, amount of network traffic/saved traffic
    • Accelerator Efficiency – accelerators that save the greatest amount to traffic.
    • Transferred Data by day – shows the amount of VM data that was read from the source and the amount that was actually transferred.
  • Tape Servers Overview
    • Overview – shows number of tape servers and the tape libraries connected to them
    • top Tape servers by processed VMs – top 5 tape servers that process and archive to tape the greatest number of VMs over the last 7 days
    • Top tape servers by transferred data – top 5 tape servers that archived the greatest amount of data to tape over the past 7 days
    • Top tape servers utilization – detect the most busy tape servers over the past 7 days (cumulative time it was retrieving, processing and transferring data)
  • Tape Servers Summary
    • Overview – number of libraries connected to the server
    • Number of Processed VMs – how many VMs the tape server processed over the past 7 days
    • Processed Data – amount of data the tape servers has archived over the past 7 days
    • Backup Window Utilization – estimates how busy the tape server was over the past 7 days.
  • Cloud Repositories Overview
    • Overview – The number of repositories created for cloud connect users, number or repository leases expiring in the next 30 days, number of VMs in backups on repositories, cumulative amount of storage occupied by VM backups on all managed repositories
    • Top Cloud Repositories by Utilization – 5 cloud repositories that have the greatest amount of used storage
    • Top Cloud Repositories with least days left – top 5 repos that can run low on storage space sooner than others
    • Top repositories by daily utilization growth – How fast the amount of space on the repositories has grown over the past 7 days.
  • Cloud Repository Summary
    • Overview – name of user owning repository, date when expires, number of VMs stored in the repository, amount of space occupied
    • Capacity Planning – user quota, amount of free space, number of days before the repo runs out of space.
    • Space Utilization by Day – amount of used storage space against the amount of available space
    • Number of VMs by day – number of VMs whose backups were written to the repository during the past period.
  • Cloud Gateways Overview
    • Overview – number of cloud gateways managed, number of connections to gateways over the past 24 hours, amount of backup data that was transferred through all gateways, average amount of time during which the gateways were utilized over the past 24 hours.
    • User Connections – most loaded cloud gateways in terms of user connections
    • Data Transferred – amount of transferred data by most utilized gateways
  • Cloud Gateway Summary
    • Overview – number of users that have been connected over the past day, week, or month, TCPIP port used for external connections, Amount of backup data processed over the past day, week, or month, Amount of time that the gateway was retrieving, processing and transferring data
    • User Connections/Sessions – how many times the connection to the gateway was established to transfer backup traffic
    • Data Transferred/Processed Data – amount of backup data that the cloud gateway transferred to the cloud repo over the past period
    • Weekly/Monthly Summary – estimates just how busy the gateway was during the period.

VMware Infrastructure Dashboards

  • Virtual Infrastructure Summary – provides the health state overview for the selected object, available on the root node, as well as folders, resource pools, hosts clusters, datacenters or the vCenter Server.
    • Host State, Datastore State, VM State – healthy objects are green, those with warnings are yellow, and errors are red
    • Latest Alarms – the last 15 alarms that were triggered on the selected object
    • Alarms by Object – shows the last 15 objects with the highest number of alarms.  Displayed in an X/X format – i.e. 3/1 means 3 alarms, 1 warning.
  • ESXi Host Summary
    • Datastore State/VM State – health of the objects on the host
    • Resource Usage – capacity and performance summary for the hosts CPU and Memory
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms for the host and all its child objects
    • Alarms by Object – 15 child objects with the greatest number of alarms
  • Virtual Machine Summary
    • Selected Object – shows the health state for the selected VM\
    • CPU/Memory Usage – amount of CPU/Memory resources the VM is consuming
    • Guest Disk Usage – amount of available and used guest disk usage – broke down by disk  By default the top 5 utilized disks of the VM are shown.  Requires VMware tools
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms for the VM
    • Parent Object Health Status – shows current state of the host where the VM is running, as well as the state of the datastore where the VM resides.
  • Datastore Summary
    • Hosts State/VM state – shows health of hosts attached to datastore and VMs residing on datastore
    • Disk Space Usage – amount of available, used, and provisioned disk space
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms for datastore and objects working with this datastore
    • Latest Disk Latency – current read/write latency values and the average

Hyper-V Dashboards

  • Virtual Infrastructure Summary
    • Host/Datastore/VM States – displays health of associated objects
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms for respective objects
    • Alarms by Object – 15 objects with highest number of alarms
  • Host Summary
    • Datastore/VM state – health of associated objects
    • Resource Usage – capacity/usage summary for CPU/Memory on host/overview of volumes connected to host (capacity, free space
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms
    • Alarms by object – 15 objects with highest level of alarms
  • VM Summary
    • CPU/Memory Usage – Dynamic memory VMs show usage, static memory show 100% all the time
    • Datastore Usage – amount of storage available/consumed where the VMs reside
    • Latest alarms – last 15 alarms for the VM
    • Parent Object Health Status – health of the host VM is running on.
  • Local Storage Summary
    • Hosts/VM State – health of hosts connected, VMs hosted.
    • Disk Space Usage – amount of available/used disk space
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms for local storage
    • Latest Disk Latency – current read/write as well as average
  • SMB Share Summary
    • Hosts/VM state – health of connected hosts, VMs residing on share
    • Disk Space Usage – amount of available/used capacity
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms for share/hosts that work with share
    • Latest Disk Speed – current read/write rate, along with average over the past hour
  • Cluster Shared Volume Summary
    • Host/VM State – I’ve typed what this is enough Smile
    • Disk Space usage – free/available capacity on CSVs
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms for CSVs
    • Latest Disk Speed – current direct and redirected I/O values as well as average for past hour

vCloud Director Dashboards

  • vCD Infrastructure Summary
    • Top 5 orgs by VM Errors/Warnings /Healthy– orgs with greatest number of errors/warnings/no alarms
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms for vCD segment
    • Alarms by Object – 15 objects with greatest number of alarms
  • Provider vDCs Overview
    • Error/Warning/Health Objects – provider vDCs by state (error/warning/healthy)
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms triggered for vDCs
    • Alarms by Object – 15 objects with the greatest number of alarms
  • Provider vDC Summary
    • CPU/Memory/Storage Usage – amount of currently consumed CPU, memory and storage resources for the vDC
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms associated with vDC and its underlying objects
    • Alarms by Object – current state of hosts/datastores providing resources to the vDC
  • Organizations Overview
    • Error/Warning/Healthy Objects – groups VMs by orgs by health status
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms triggered for orgs
    • Alarms By Object – 15 objects with greatest number of alarms.
  • Organization Summary
    • VMs by State – summary health of VMs in the organization
    • Latest Blocking Tasks – last 15 suspended operations that require approval
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms for orgs, org vDCs, VMs and vApps associated with orgs
    • Alarms by Object – 15 objects with greatest number of alarms
  • Organization vDC Summary
    • VMs by State – typed this too much Smile
    • Expired vApps – vApps whose runtime/storage lease is expired.
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms for org vDC and child objects
    • Alarms by Object – 15 objects with greatest number of alarms
  • vApp Summary
    • VMs by State – see previous dashboard
    • VMs by Tools State – groups VMs in the vApp by VMware Tools State.
    • VMs by Power State – groups VMs in the vApp by their power status
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms for the vApp and VMs within it.
    • Alarms by Object – 15 objects with the greatest number of alarms
  • VM Summary
    • CPU/Memory Usage – show the amount of CPU/Memory resources VM is consuming
    • Guest Disk Usage – amount of available and used guest disk usage (needs VMware Tools)
    • Latest Alarms – last 15 alarms for the VM
    • Parent Object Health Status – current health state of host