Tag Archives: vCenter

vCenter Operations and Virtual Machine Faults

Every morning I like to fire up vCOps and have a look at my environment and when I do this, I like to see nothing but green (maybe a bit of yellow :))  For the past week or so that hasn't been the case…  Not that I have any performance issues, but I do have what is called a 'fault' on a few of my Virtual Machines.  I've been troubleshooting an issue as of late with something causing a few of my hosts to become disconnected, and HA has been attempting (and failing) to restart a few of my VMs, which in turns generates an alarm on the VM and a fault inside of vCOps.  Well, the issue has since been resolved and everything is running fine again, however vCOps is still hanging on to those faults for some of the VMs.

Now I don't see this as a bad thing, it certainly is nice to have a record of these issues inside of vCOps, but being the persnickety fellow that I am when I log into my vCOps and see those VMs showing up on the heat map coloured in red, well, it drives me a little mental…  I thought maybe if I leave it for a week things would clear up, and while some did, others didn't.  So I guess a little manual intervention is involved.

Basically, a fault in vCOps is triggered by an event occurring from within vCenter Server.  VC Ops will hang on to this fault until vCenter Server reports that the issue has been resolved, thus resulting in a red VM like the one above, and a lower health score to boot!  In some cases (cases like mine) you may need to manually cancel and remove a fault from vCOps.  So in the case you ever need to, the following is how to do so…

Either select your VM, or any inventory item that is higher up on the inventory view and navigate to the Alerts tab.

 

In the Alerts table below, sort, filter, re-arrange however you want and select the fault(s) that you want to cancel and click the 'Cancel' Icon.

Presto!  That's it!  If you navigate back to your dashboard and heat map now you should hopefully see that wonderful greenish tint of all that excellence (after everything refreshes)!  Or in my case there is still more work to do πŸ™‚  Happy Troubleshooting!

Getting rid of that pesky shell warning in ESXi 5

We all know that we can enable SSH and the ESXi shell from within the vSphere client or through the DCUI.  This is a great feature that lets us get into the ESXi command space and run things like esxtop, esxcli commands, etc…  Problem being, that once these shells are enabled we get that pesky shell/SSH warning displayed in our vSphere client, as well, that all too familiar yellow triangle gets labeled on our host.  Now, I don't like seeing any warnings on my hosts, especially those dealing with something as minor as SSH.  Good thing is, there is a very easy way to remove or suppress these warnings.

First off, the advanced configuration setting to do this is located in the software section under 'Advanced Settings'->UserVars->UserVars.SuppressShellWarning'.  By default this setting will be set to 0, meaning display the warning.  To hide it, simply set this option to 1.

There you go!  Easy enough… if you only have one host!  But what if you had multiple clusters full of multiple hosts…. well, that's where PowerCLI comes into play.  First off, connect to your vCenter server using the Connect-VIServer servername CMDLET.  Once connected, the following command will loop though a given cluster and modify the setting on every host…

foreach ($esxhost in get-VMHost -Location CLUSTERNAME ) { $esxhost | Set-VMHostAdvancedConfiguration -Name UserVars.SuppressShellWarning -Value 1 }

And there you go!  A happy, non warning triangle life for you!

Scott Lowe’s Mastering VMware vSphere 5 – A Review

Throughout the holidays I had a little downtime and what better way to fill it but with some new learning.  I've had a copy of Scott Lowe's Mastering VMware vSphere 5 laying around for a few weeks and with my intents to start ramping up my VCP 5 studies I thought I would would dive right into it.

Now, I've never had the opportunity to read Scotts precursor 'Mastering VMware vSphere 4' bur from the reviews that I have read it was a smashing success.  I can honestly say that Mastering VMware vSphere 5 is the same.  A whopping 768 pages covers everything vSphere 5 has to offer and is laid out in such a fashion that it is understandable to the newbie to virtualization, yet still dives technically into subjects to provide that level of interest to an expert.  By that I mean Scott not only covers off the basics of virtualization, the basics of vSphere technology and the initial setup of common components, but he takes you deeper into the products by explaining many advanced features and how to configure them (using not only the vSphere Client but the vMA command line as well).  To top it off he does this in a fashion that is understandable and applicable to me as a vSphere Admin (If you have ever seen any of Scotts' presentations you will know what I mean).

Mastering VMware vSphere 5 covers everything you need to know to install, configure and manage a solid vSphere 5 environment covering off every aspect of the journey.  The chapter layout says it all…

  • Introducing VMware vSphere 5
  • Securing VMware vSphere
  • Planning and Installing VMware ESXi
  • Creating and Managing Virtual Machines
  • Installing and Configuring vCenter Server
  • Using Templates and vApps
  • Installing and Configuring vSphere Update Manager
  • Managing Resource Allocation
  • Creating and Configuring Virtual Networks
  • Balancing Resource Utilization
  • Creating and Configuring Storage Devices
  • Monitoring VMware vSphere Performance
  • Ensuring High Availability and Business Continuity
  • Automating VMware vSphere

For anyone looking to achieve VCP 5 status (like myself), each and every chapter contains a section at the end titled 'The Bottom Line'.  The Bottom Line contains key takeaways from the chapter and then asks you questions under a Master It heading.  To me this is a huge selling point of this book as it triggers you to think back on what you have just read, answer questions, and apply it to certain scenarios that you are presented with.  A great way to help you retain and apply knowledge!

Honestly I sat and read this book from cover to cover which I rarely do with technical books.  But that's not to say that it isn't referencable in any way.  In the few short days I've had it on my desk at work it is already peppered with post-it notes, bookmarks, and torn pieces of paper with chicken scratch and design ideas scribbled all over. This book provided me with a great resource to help with the install/upgrade and management of my vSphere environment and an excellent piece of study material to help complement all of the documentation on the VCP 5 exam blueprint, and a great technical overview of some of the functions of vSphere that I haven't had the chance to explore myself.  So, if you are looking for any or all of those things I would most certainly recommend picking up a copy of Scott Lowe's Mastering VMware vSphere 5.  The book is available directly from the publisher both in e-pub format as well as paperback.  You can also find it on iTunes, Barne's and Noble, and Amazon.  Also Scott has a fantastic blog where you can read more of his words, and don't forget to follow him on Twitter.

The vSphere Web Client Server – First Impressions.

 

The release of vSphere 5 brought us many new features and enhancements around the management and operations of our day to day tasks as a VI Admin.  I'm slowly but surely trying to have a look at each and every one of these to try and validate whether they are valuable in a production environment or more suited for a home lab or test/dev.  Next up is the vSphere Web Client server which essentially provides end-users with an OS independent web based version of the original vSphere Client.  Although some new features, such as the vCenter Server Appliance are not quite ready IMO for the production environment I believe VMware hit a homerun with with the Web Client!

Some spots where the Web Client actually provides an improvement IMO are…

  • Obviously OS Independent.  You can can access this client from your Mac, Linux Box, Tablet.  As long as your device supports flash you can run this. Which leads me to my next point…
  • Prerequisites – Just Flash!  No C++, .net this .net that…just a supported browser (IE and Firefox) No Chrome πŸ™ and Flash!  That's it!
  • The 'Work In Progress' window/widget/component – not sure what they are calling these little windows.  The ability to minimize your current task or wizard that you are running through, go do a few other things, and pick it up where you left off.  This was something you couldn't do in the vSphere Client (for instance, go look at your storage in the middle of creating a new VM).  You can even pick up this task if you log out and log back in!
  • Customization of UI – you can customize this to your hearts delight, minimize certain windows, maximize others.  Only downfall is it doesn't seem to stick after you logout! πŸ™
  • It's Sexy! – Lets face it, we all love a great UI!  The Web Client is no exception.  Built on Adobe Flex framework the client is nicely laid out and very responsive!

There is however a few spots in which the Web Client is lacking; a few that I've noticed so far are listed below…

  • No Access to vSphere Permissions – I can't see the ability to add/edit/modify permissions at all from within the web ui.
  • Cannot create new Datacenters or Clusters, or subsequently connect new hosts to existing ones.
  • No access to apply or generate DRS recommendations.  Better make sure you are running in fully automated mode if you plan to use the web client exclusively.
  • Cannot really modify any entities except VMs.  Meaning you can't change the configuration of a host, switch, cluster, etc.  Basically, outside of editing a VM all you can really do is take hosts in and out of maintenance mode!
  • No access to maps.  I would definitely miss this πŸ™
  • No way to deploy an ovf – With a lot of VMware's new management products being pushed out in an ovf format the ability to deploy them would be…well…it's a must!
  • No access to plugins – No Update Manager, no converter, no VCOPS, etc…

I'm sure there are many more differences, but those are just a few that I've noticed right off the hop.  VMware has said that they are going to continue to develop the Web Client and in fact it will eventually replace the vSphere Client so you can bet that all of the features that are in the Windows client will eventually be ported to the Web Client.  That being said, out of the box today I think it is still a great resource, especially for users just looking to manage their subset of VMs and not worry about the infrastructure behind it.  And for the most part as a VI Admin I believe I can probably perform 80% of my daily tasks from within the Web Client interface.  All in all I'd give VMware a thumbs up on the Web Client.  This is a very good release for a 1.0 version with a lot the functionality from an application owners perspective built in and will eventually be a full fledged vSphere Client for everyone to use.  For more information on how to install and configure the vSphere Web Client check out this post.

Installing and Configuring the new vSphere 5 Web Client server

With the release of vSphere 5 came an alternative means of accessing and managing your virtual infrastructure through a web browser called the vSphere Web Client.  The web client doesn't give you all of the functionality that the original vSphere client does, but it is certainly a great first step in porting over the functionality into a more sustainable means of supporting the VI client.  I don't plan on getting into the differences between the vSphere Client and the Web Client in this post as I've already done that here.  This post will focus mainly on the installation and configuration of the new VMware vSphere Web Client server.

Honestly, installation is a breeze and probably doesn't even warrant a blog post but I've already documented it and will throw it up here just in case its' ever needed.  First off you will need to pick a server to install the Web Client server on.  I personally used my vCenter server and that appears to be the target of choice for other users in the community.  Also, on any workstation/server you wish to access the client from you will need to have flash player 10.1.0 or greater installed.

1.  The Web Client server installation software is bundled in with the vCenter Server installation media.  So mount that ISO or extract the zip archive on your server of choice.  The ISO should autorun.  When it does, select the 'VMware vSphere Web Client server' option and click 'Install'.

 

 

2.  From here until the end of the installation you are on your own.  Honestly there isn't much to configure during the installation process.  Essentially you can define what ports you want to run on and change the licensee information, that's about all!  So for the most part it's a Next Next Finish process.

3.  Wow!  That's it!  Done the install, now time to do a little configuration.  Open up a supported browser (IE 7/8, Firefox 3.6+ – No Chrome πŸ™ ) and browse to Web Client Administration interface @ https://localhost:9443/admin-app/  (replacing localhost and the port with your information of course).  This task cannot be performed remotely from another workstation, it must be done on the server in which you installed the Web Client role.  What we need to do is attach our vSphere Web Client to an instance of Virtual Center.  You do this by selecting 'Register vCenter Server' in the top right hand corner. (optionally you can use a script called admin-cmd.bat to do this as well).

 

 

4.  Enter the appropriate information and user credentials to connect to your vCenter instance.  If you chose to install the Web Client server on the same server as your vCenter instance then your vCenter Server name and your vSphere Web Client server name should match.  Once done click 'Register'  You may get prompted with an SSL warning, just check to 'Install' the certificate and click 'Ignore'.

 

 

There you have it!  The Web Client server is installed and configured!  In order to access it browse to https://WEBCLIENT:9443/vsphere-client/ replacing webclient with your address of course.  For the most part a lot of the functionality around managing a VM is included, however more infrastructure related tasks such as adding hosts or configuring storage seem to be missing.  Be patient though, VMware has come out and said that this is the future of the vSphere Client so it won't be long until we start to see some new functionality rolled into this product.

Installing and Configuring the VMware vCenter Appliance

Well, I've finally got around to getting my 'lab' setup inside of VMware Workstation and I thought the first thing that I would try out would be the new in vSphere 5, the VMware vCenter Appliance.

The VMware vCenter Appliance is a pre-configured Linux-based virtual machine that is optimized for running vCenter Server and its' associated services.  Although the appliance will give you most of what the Windows based vCenter installation will give you there are some limitations.  I'm not going to go too much into detail as many people have already blogged about the situations.  Duncan Epping has a good little post on what it is lacking here.  The biggest for me is no Update Manager, no MSSQL support, and as well if using the embedded DB2 database you are limited for support for only 5 hosts and 50 VMs.  You can get support for more hosts and VMs, but you need to use an Oracle database to support it.

That being said, it's still a great solution for an SMB or a lab situation where you want to get  an instance of VMware vCenter Server up and running quickly as well as save some cost on Microsoft licensing.  The installation and configuration was a breeze and I had the appliance up and running within about 10 minutes.  The official documentation for installing and configuring the appliance can be found here, and mine…below πŸ™‚

First off, you will need to go and download the OVF and the 2 associated vmdk's that go along with it and deploy it as you would any other virtual appliance (File -> Deploy OVF Template).  

Once the appliance has been copied up to your environment, added to your inventory, mapped to your networks, and powered on, have a look at the console to determine how to connect to your vCenter. The console should display what IP has been assigned (you can change this later).  You should be able to access it by opening a browser session to http://IP_ADDRESS:5480/

Once you have your browser window connected, the default credentials to login are root/vmware.  After accepting the EULA, click on the 'Networking' tab and then 'Configure Networking'  Here you can set up your ip address, gateway, dns, etc.

Next is the database, head to the 'Database' tab and input your desired configuration.  I chose to use the embedded option however if you have an Oracle instance you can chose to host your database on it.  Once done select 'Test Settings', if everything checks out click 'Save Settings'.

Then, move to the 'Status' tab and click on 'Start vCenter'.

This process for real takes less than 10 minutes and you now have a functional vCenter instance running in your environment that you can now connect to with either the vSphere Client or the Web Client and configure, manage, and provision to your hearts delight.

I've just grazed over the basic settings here that you need to setup in order to get your vCenter Server Appliance up and running.  There are obviously many other functions and tasks that you can perform in the configuration page of the appliance so I encourage everyone to have a look for themselves or take a peek at the official documentation to get up to speed.  As always comments, issues, concerns, questions, suggestions are welcome and encouraged in the comments box below.

Access to VM Console without the vSphere Client

How can I grant access to the console of a VM to an end user without requiring them to install the vSphere client? How do I grant one of our vendors or partners access to the console of a VM without allowing them to see all of our guests?. I see questions like these pop up on the VMTN forums over and over again and I always answer it the same. Generate a VMware Remote Console URL! Or I guess a Virtual Machine Shortcut would be the official wording for it. Basically a Virtual Machine Shortcut is simply a URL that you can generate through vCenter Web Access which would allow anyone(with authentication of course) to connect to the console of a VM using only a supported browser. Now I say supported browser due to the fact that a plug-in needs to be installed in order to view the VM console. Currently supported browsers include only Microsoft Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox.  I'm not even sure of the versions that are required as I can't seem to find any documentation around the plug-in itself.  The end user will also need to have valid permissions set up within vCenter on the targeted VM. As long as the end user meets those two requirements then actually generating the URL is pretty simple and straightforward.  And here's how…

Login to the vCenter Web Access by pointing your browser to https://ip-of-your-vcenter-server/ and select the 'Log In To Web Access' link in the top right hand corner.

From here, after you are logged in you will have to navigate on the left hand side through your datacenters and folders until you locate and select the VM you would like to grant access to.  Once the VM is selected you should see the 'Generate Virtual Machine Shortcut' option under the commands section on the summary tab.

Once the Generate shortcut link is clicked you will be presented with the actual URL and a few options.  Here is where you can do things like hide the event log of the selected virtual machine, as well as limit the view to that Virtual Machine only, and obscure the URL that it generates as well to make it harder to guess.

Simply send this URL to your end user and once they have entered this address into a browser they should be good to go and you should be happy that your work is done.  All they need to do is copy/paste that URL into either IE or Firefox and they should be presented with the console of the VM.

What I'm not sure of, and might be a good idea to have, is the ability to have these URLs expire or time-out.  I don't think you would want them just hanging around forever. πŸ™‚

The number of virtual devices exceeds the maximum for a given controller!!

Yes, that's the error I was presented with this morning after attempting to clone a new VM from a template. The number of virtual devices exceeds the maximum for a given controller!!

It's such a great error message, so explanatory. immediately I went to look at the number of drives in the VM, thinking maybe it has too many virtual disks or is attached to some other virtual disk or something, however, it only had 2….so, once again I turn to my pre-vmware support techniques (Google).

So, results pointed me to this KB article. Easy enough fix right, don't edit the hardware while cloning. which after some digging was exactly what had been done. Well…problem solved right?  Not really…

I looked at a few of the other google results, which all pointed to converting the template back to a vm, and selecting the correct network. I thought I would do this, as some of our templates still had the old default 'VM Network' attached to them, and since then we have added some different VLAN networks, which were our new default vm networks. So, hey, lets just do it anyways, templates were probably in dire need of some updating anyway.

So, convert to VM, right click -> Edit Settings…. Lets have a look….

or not!!!!

PropertyCollector.RetrieveContents for object "propertyCollector" on vCenter Server blah blah blah….of course….that's what's wrong with it…

So….what to do now…a few more google searches and the old remove/add trick and I'm back in business…

Basically, right click the VM -> Remove from Inventory. Then, browse the datastore that the VM lives on, right click on the .vmx file and 'Add to Inventory' and I was back in business….

I could once again edit the settings of that VM. By the time I got around to this however, I was tired…and couldn't remember what I was looking for in the first place…right, the networks…Nope! They were fine…However after completing all these steps I was able to do a successful clone.

Migrating vCenter to a new server

Maybe its during the upgrade from vSphere 4.0 to 4.1 and you require the 64 bit hardware. Maybe you need to upgrade to take advantages of a newer OS and you just don't trust the next next done that Microsoft provides you. Maybe its the fact that you currently have a physical vCenter and you want to take advantage of VMware High Availability and Distributed Resource Scheduler. Or maybe its the complete opposite and you are currently virtualized and you have your reasons to be physical. Whatever your reasons may be, there will more than likely be a time where you as a VI admin will want or have to migrate your vCenter to a new server. In my case, it was option number 4.

We had been running a virtualized vCenter ever since our upgrade to vSphere 4, however with the addition of the Distributed Virtual Switch, along with more and more third party applications depending on vCenter, coupled with a failure that left me unable to assign a vm to a network I just thought it was time to move our vCenter Server outside of the cluster that it was controlling. The decision to go physical was purely an overkill, but i wanted to have my vCenter completely disconnected from the san fabrics and interconnects that are currently the interworkings of our i/o flowing in and out of our hosts. I had read about the recommendation of management clusters, but the costs of building that would for sure outweigh the advantages of having it virtualized. Also, this will give us a central spot to house our PowerCli scripts and also run our UPS shutdown scripts from. So, physical it is, and here is my plan to get there. It wouldnt have been much of a concern but i wanted to have a solution where the dvSwitches would continue to function, and where i wouldnt need to go and touch every host afterwards. So, assigning this new physical vCenter the same name and same IP was a key step. Since i wanted to ensure a smooth transition i ran this one through the lab first using these steps. So here is what i had. vCenter1 (the current active vCenter) and vCenter2 (the new vCenter).

1. Get everything that you need (vCenter installation, 64 bit sql native client, sysprep files, etc). If vCenter1 is virtualized be sure to take note on which host its running on as you will need to disable or disconnect its network later on.
2. When you are ready to go stop the vCenter service on vCenter1.
3. Now we need to disconnect or disable the network on vCenter1.
4. Delete the current computer account for vCenter1 from active directory. I assume you could also just rename it, i just chose to delete the account.
5. Now lets move over to vCenter2 and do a few things. Rename this machine to vCentre1 and also give it the same ip as vCenter1. This should ensure that we don't have to ssh into each host after the upgrade and touch the hosts file.
6. Now just complete the installation of vCenter on vCenter2 which is the now vCenter1. (Confused yet?). Note – when asked about the database be sure to select to use the existing db, otherwise you can kiss all your hard work goodbye.

Thats all, you should be able to connect to your new vCenter instance using the same name or IP as you always have. You may have to reconnect your hosts however, as a new password for the vpxuser would have been generated with the new install and the hosts and vCenter will be out of sync. Thats as simple as right clicking your host, selecting connect and providing root credentials though. There you have it, a brand new vCenter! While your at it you might as well defragment your vCenter Server database as well to give it that snappy new feeling again. Also, there is a KB article which takes you through some of the steps above here. As always if you notice anything that I'm lacking or if I'm performing actions that will cause the market to crash please comment and let me know.

HA Error: Unable to contact a primary HA agent.

Ok, here's a quick one of an issue and resolution (sort of) that I ran into today.  Whether or not I actually fixed the error and whether or not the error will come back only time will tell.

Basically, I was running some updates on a few hosts today, taking them in and out of maintenance mode when the following error occurred.

"Cannot complete the configuration of the HA agent on the host.  Unable to contact a primary HA agent."  

Sounds kind of scary at the start.  I had no clue what was causing this and was a little worried that maybe through some sort of magic that a host may be somehow declared isolated and start to restart vm's.  Basically, I tried to disable and re-enable HA, however the process seemed to be taking a long time and always getting stuck at 72%.  I restarted the vCenter server service in order to cancel the tasks, then tried re-enabling HA again…same slowness, same 72% hang up.  After a few attempts I finally decided to wait to see if it was really hung up.  After a certain amount of time, not sure how long it was, but it was quite a while, the HA configuration failed and moved on to the next host…which in turn took the same amount of time and failed.  It wasn't until I allowed this process to continue and fail on every host that things started to work as expected.  After it had timed out itself, it was just a matter of disabling HA, letting that process finish, and then re-enabling HA and letting that process finish that all of my HA errors had cleared.  I'm peachy now!  Moral of the story, don't mess with the HA tasks, even if they seem to be taking forever, just let them be and time out by themselves πŸ™‚  Also, note to self – Buy Duncan and Franks book – I think I need it!!

Giving vCenter a kick in the rearend!! – Defragmenting your vCenter Database

I've seen this happen numerous times on a number of our VMware vCenter installations.  For the first few months(sometimes days)  vCenter Server is very snappy and responsive, when moving from page to page things come up instantly and moving between different statistics and metrics on performance graphs is veryquick.  Then, as time goes by, things begin to drag down a bit, tabs start to take a little bit longer to load when moving between them, performance graphs can throw exceptions and things just generally slow down.

Of course there are many issues that could be causing this to happen, but the most common that I have found is a fairly simple one, a neglected VMware vCenter DB that is full of fragmentation and in need of a little TLC.  I don't want to go into what exactly database/index fragmentation is, but a good read if you have the time (and interest) is here.  Also, VMware has released KB Article 1003990 as well, which covers off fragmentation within the vCenter DB.

And then there is also my explanation….

When I'm looking at tuning my vCenter DB, the tables that I find myself always defragmenting are as follows..

VPX_HIST_STAT1
VPX_HIST_STAT2
VPX_HIST_STAT3
VPX_HIST_STAT4
VPX_TOPN_PAST_DAY
VPX_TOPN_PAST_WEEK
VPX_TOPN_PAST_MONTH
VPX_TOPN_PAST_YEAR

As you may guess, these tables hold historical and rolled up performance statistics and data.  Since vCenter is always  collecting data (depending of course on your Intervals and durations) these tables are constantly being updated (New stats coming in, old stats going out).  Just as in file level defragmentation, the large number of writes, updates, and deletes causes some tables to become heavily fragmented.

I'm not going to go through defragmenting all of these as it is the same steps for each table/index.  For this purpose I'll just go through VPX_HIST_STAT3.  First off, to see the fragmentation inside a table just run the following command in SQL Server Management Studio

USE [vcenter database name] GO
dbcc showcontig([tablename],[indexname])
GO

You can retrieve the names of the indexes either from  KB Article 1003990 or by expanding the Indexes folder in SSMS.  Essentially this command translates to..

Use VIM_VCDB
GO
dbcc showcontig ('VPX_HIST_STAT3','PK_VPX_HIST_STAT3')
GO

In my example this returns the following stats.

To summarize these results for a VI Admin, the lines that you should really be looking at is 'Scan Density' and 'Logical Scan Fragmentation'.  In short, you want Scan Density to be as close to 100% as possible, and Logical Scan Fragmentation to be as close to 0% as possible.  To defrag the indexes in this table we use the following command….

dbcc indexdefrag('[databasename]’,'[tablename]’,'[indexname]')

so, after filling in the values we get…

dbcc indexdefrag ('VIM_VCDB','VPX_HIST_STAT3','PK_VPX_HIST_STAT3')
 
which then returns….
 

As you can see we now have a lower Logical Scan Fragmentation and a higher Scan Density.  This is the expected result we want from the defragmentation.  Just repeat this step on all of the indexes and tables you want to defragment and you should be enjoying a much snappier, more responsive vCenter Server in no time.  Keep in mind, some smaller indexes and tables will always be fragmented and not much can be done to correct that issue.  Personally, I concentrate on the 8 tables listed above.  Keep these tables/indexes happy and you are well on your way….